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General FAQ's

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Elite Screens' Blog Team
2017/03/02,

Elite Screens' Blog Team

Q: What are the main aspects (ie. cost and features) that I should use in comparing the various projection screen brands?
A:
Although there are many manufacturers that cover a variety of retail and integrator sales channels, product quality, features and pricing are still the driving critera for increased projection screen sales. The general pricing matrix that most follow is that  a good projection screen equates to roughly 1/3 to ½ of the cost of a projector.  Comparative features include the screen’s ability to provide clear color reproduction, contrast and a level of brightness that is suitable to the environment in which it will be used. Equally important is the product’s overall flawless quality and reliablility as well as included features such as IR/RF and Ethernet controls  along with other accessories.

 

Q: What size of screen should I get for my room?
A:
The best way to do it is to make sure the screen's diagonal size matches the distance to you first row of seating.  There is not set standard size for a room, just consider the seating location of you and your guests.  Your material should allow everyone to comfortably sit and watch without craning their necks back or shifting their eyes from side to side. Generally, 84" - 106" diagonal sizes are appropriate for your typical residential setup.

 

Q: Should I get a 1:1, 4:3, 16:9, 16:10 or 2.35:1 format screen?
A:
It depends entirely what your intentions are but here are the general format uses to help you out.

  • 1:1 format: If you use traditional Slideshow/OHP (Overhead Projector), Document Camera, and commercial projector presentations. These are most commonly used in schools, government facilities, and houses of worship.
  • 4:3 NTSC format: PC software, Commercial Presentations (if your projector is SVGA or XGA native resolution), Classroom Training, and Gaming.
  • 16:9 HDTV format: Home Theater Movies and Gaming
  • 16:10 format: PC software, video games, video editing, presentations from notebooks with WXGA or WUGA native output.
  • 2.35:1 Cinemascope format: Strictly Home Theater movies.

Q: What would be a good screen for my home theater room if I was planning on using it for regular TV and not just movies?
A:
Although the sky's the limit when it comes to getting a home theater projector, there are 3 basic qualities that define the typical mainstream consumer product.

  1. Price point is at or below $4,000 USD
  2. Your Projector's Contrast Ratio is higher than 2500:1
  3. Your Projector has a 16:9 (HDTV) Native Aspect Ratio

Matte White is the most widely used material because of its superior versatility and it is recommended over high gain or contrast gray surfaces.  It has a wide diffusion uniformity for maximum visibility and will get satisfactory results with virtually any front projection array.  It is recommended over high gain material because high gain concentrates the diffusion into a narrow viewing cone with sharp color enhancement which is great for a dedicated home theater environment but not preferred for a multi-purpose room due to its limited visibility angle.  Contrast gray material enhances black level contrast for older DLP and entry level LCD projectors but also does this at the expense of diminished light return which means it should be used only with high output projectors.
 
Front projection should generally be used in a setting with controlled lighting or no ambient light at all.

  • MaxWhite®: Standard matte white textured material
  • MaxWhite® FG: Matte white textured material with Fiber Glass backing for enhanced rigidity
  • CineWhite®: PVC tension reinforced variant of matte white
  • AcousticPro1080™: Acoustically sound transparent matte white weaved material

 Elite Screens suggests the following Projection Screen types

  1. Wall / Ceiling / In-Ceiling - (Manual and Electric) *See Manual, Manual SRM, Spectrum, VMAX2, Home2, CineTension2, Evanesce, and Evanesce Tension
  2. Wall only (For dedicated home theater) - Fixed Frame * See Sable Frame, ezFrame, 
  3. Outdoor, Portable Business, or Recreational Presentations (Floor Pull Up or Folding Frame Screens) * See QuickStand, QuickStand Drape, ezCinema, ezCinema Plus, Tripod, Tripod Pro
  4. Indoor, Electric Floor Rising * See Kestrel, Kestrel Tension

Q: What is the best projection screen option for a ultra/short-throw projector?
A:
Ultra/Short-throw projectors require a flat projection surface since the projector’s light is closer to the material.  Non-tensioned screen materials may exhibit minor wave or curls which may be more pronounced if using an ultra/short-throw projector.

We recommend using a Fixed Frame Screen or a Tab-Tension screen with PVC such as our CineWhite® flexible material which will provide adequate tension throughout the entire projection surface. Please click here to learn more about the CineWhite® screen material.

Our Aeon CLR®, EDGE FREE® Fixed Frame is recommended for table-top ultra-short throw projectors in an ambient light room environment. Please click here to learn more about the Aeon CLR®.

 

Q: I have a 16:9 (HDTV) home theater projector but I'd like to have a presentation that has a 2.35:1 (Cinemascope) aspect ratio on a 2.35:1 projection screen. Do I need an anamorphic lens for this?
A:
For the best possible results, an anamorphic lens is recommended.  However, it is possible to get a 2.35:1 screen format as long as you can live with the "black bars" created when a mismatched 16:9 native aspect ratio projecto is set up to fit a wider projection screen format.  It is simply a matter of personal preference.

 

Q: I just got a good deal on a SVGA Projector with a contrast ratio 2500:1. It gets good quality in a 100" image on a white wall so I am planning to get a screen without spending too much. What should I buy?
A:
Many people are using SVGA Projectors for videos and gaming with good results.  Here are some ideas for selecting your Projection Screen.

  • Step 1: Choose a screen that is somewhere between the $100 to $400 price point (excluding size factors). As a rule of thumb, try to keep the cost of your screen to about 30% of your projector's cost for the sake of proportional spending.
  • Step 2: Choose a 4:3 or 16:9 format screen, depending on how much time you will be involved with TV, gaming or movies that have various formats from 4:3, 16:9, and 2.35:1.
  • Step 3: MaxWhite or CineWhite is the best choice for you.  But you may also consider high contrast gray material to improve your black levels if you are watching presentation with an SVGA projector with a low contrast ratio at about 2000:1 with a high output that exceeds 1500 lumens.  Contrast gray is primarily used to improve black levels but the diminished light return should always be considered.

Q: How high should I hang the projector screen?
A:
As a rule, it is recommended to ensure that the center of the screen is in alignment with the eye level of those seated in the first row of a graduated Home Theater seating layout.  This will provide the best levels of ergonomic stability, and will not negatively affect the vantage point of the following rows as their increased distance from the screen will provide a comfortable viewing position as well.